cortexiphansubject47:

alilfallofrain:

veganhealing:

colorsofsocialjustice:

colorsofsocialjustice:

contra-indication:

spondylitis:

The nerve!….This goes out to all the spoonies.
Read this:
“My name is Emelie Crecco, I’m 20 years old and I have cystic fibrosis. CF affects the lungs (as of many organs in the body) because of this I have a handicapped sticker. I’m not one to “abuse” the sticker, meaning I use it when I’m having a “bad day” (some days its a little harder to breathe). Today was HOT so I needed to use my sticker. I was running errands all day around my town, I pulled into a handicapped spot, placed the sticker in my mirror and continued into the store. Upon returning to my car I found a note written by someone, it said “Shame on you, you are NOT handicapped. You have taken a space that could have been used by an actually handicapped person. You are a selfish young lady.” I was LIVID. How can someone be so ignorant and cowardly? They clearly saw me walk out of my car, why not approach me? Not all handicaps are visible. I would love for you to share this story. It would help spread awareness for CF, but it would help open people’s minds to what handicapped really is.  Thank you for your time” ~Emelie Crecco

A friend of mine fell over 20 feet and basically broke half his ribs, punctured his lung, broke his arm in three places that required many surgeries to fix and messed up a nerve in his leg. He had to walk with a cane for a long time after it and some lady in a restaurant thought he was just walking with a cane for the hell of it and she ripped it from his hands and grabbed his messed up arm and shook him and told him he was an awful human being for pretending to be handicapped. What the fuck people?

This is what real ableism looks like.

I have ulcerative colitis, an autoimmune disorder which causes my body to attack my colon, and I qualify for one of those stickers. I’m scared to get one, though, because I look healthy and whole.-Orange

This whole post makes me feel nauseous. I have ulcerative colitis and one of the things that really gets to me is how people who don’t know me perceive me when I’m going through a flare up. Whoever wrote that note has clearly never been ill and could never understand. If this ever happened to me… I don’t even know.

I have UC/Crohns, have had several surgeries, have used handicap tags on multiple occasions, and often need wheelchairs for things like airports and theme parks - even when I’m having a “good” day, if it’s 90+ degrees out I can’t walk around Disney for hours on end or I would end up hospitalized for a week. I’m young and I look younger - and the looks I get are terrible. Even when no one says anything I get stares and disapproving looks and I can practically hear the “you aren’t handicap! You’re laughing and joking with your friend! You look perfectly healthy! What’s wrong with you?!”
It’s not just ableism, either, because I get looks and comments from people who are disabled who think I’m faking because I’m so young - it’s absolutely also an age thing.

When I was seventeen I developed a rare autoimmune disorder, Acute Disseminated Encephalomyelitis with Transverse Myelitis. It’s very similar to Multiple Sclerosis. After I got out of the hospital and was cleared to drive again my doctor insisted I have a handicapped placard because I was still having trouble walking long distances and had severe back pain. I met my family at Olive Garden just a few weeks after receiving my placard and parked in a handicapped spot, I hated doing it but I recognized that I needed it, I wasn’t doing myself any favors pretending nothing was wrong. As I was exiting the car an older woman and her friend made comments about me, essentially saying I was a selfish and disgusting human being for using the parking spot. They made sure to say this within earshot but not to my face. I was so angry that I confronted her and told her that I had an autoimmune disease and not to be so quick to judge. She accused me of lying and screamed in my face. I ended up spending half the dinner in the bathroom crying. I had so much guilt for using what I needed medically, between the looks I to at school having to use it and then being attacked publicly….no one should have to feel that way. Don’t be so quick to judge, just because someone looks fine on the outside doesn’t mean they are.

cortexiphansubject47:

alilfallofrain:

veganhealing:

colorsofsocialjustice:

colorsofsocialjustice:

contra-indication:

spondylitis:

The nerve!….This goes out to all the spoonies.

Read this:

My name is Emelie Crecco, I’m 20 years old and I have cystic fibrosis. CF affects the lungs (as of many organs in the body) because of this I have a handicapped sticker. I’m not one to “abuse” the sticker, meaning I use it when I’m having a “bad day” (some days its a little harder to breathe). Today was HOT so I needed to use my sticker. I was running errands all day around my town, I pulled into a handicapped spot, placed the sticker in my mirror and continued into the store. Upon returning to my car I found a note written by someone, it said “Shame on you, you are NOT handicapped. You have taken a space that could have been used by an actually handicapped person. You are a selfish young lady.” I was LIVID. How can someone be so ignorant and cowardly? They clearly saw me walk out of my car, why not approach me? Not all handicaps are visible. I would love for you to share this story. It would help spread awareness for CF, but it would help open people’s minds to what handicapped really is.
Thank you for your time”
~Emelie Crecco

A friend of mine fell over 20 feet and basically broke half his ribs, punctured his lung, broke his arm in three places that required many surgeries to fix and messed up a nerve in his leg. He had to walk with a cane for a long time after it and some lady in a restaurant thought he was just walking with a cane for the hell of it and she ripped it from his hands and grabbed his messed up arm and shook him and told him he was an awful human being for pretending to be handicapped. What the fuck people?

This is what real ableism looks like.

I have ulcerative colitis, an autoimmune disorder which causes my body to attack my colon, and I qualify for one of those stickers. I’m scared to get one, though, because I look healthy and whole.
-Orange

This whole post makes me feel nauseous. I have ulcerative colitis and one of the things that really gets to me is how people who don’t know me perceive me when I’m going through a flare up. Whoever wrote that note has clearly never been ill and could never understand. If this ever happened to me… I don’t even know.

I have UC/Crohns, have had several surgeries, have used handicap tags on multiple occasions, and often need wheelchairs for things like airports and theme parks - even when I’m having a “good” day, if it’s 90+ degrees out I can’t walk around Disney for hours on end or I would end up hospitalized for a week. I’m young and I look younger - and the looks I get are terrible. Even when no one says anything I get stares and disapproving looks and I can practically hear the “you aren’t handicap! You’re laughing and joking with your friend! You look perfectly healthy! What’s wrong with you?!”

It’s not just ableism, either, because I get looks and comments from people who are disabled who think I’m faking because I’m so young - it’s absolutely also an age thing.

When I was seventeen I developed a rare autoimmune disorder, Acute Disseminated Encephalomyelitis with Transverse Myelitis. It’s very similar to Multiple Sclerosis. After I got out of the hospital and was cleared to drive again my doctor insisted I have a handicapped placard because I was still having trouble walking long distances and had severe back pain. I met my family at Olive Garden just a few weeks after receiving my placard and parked in a handicapped spot, I hated doing it but I recognized that I needed it, I wasn’t doing myself any favors pretending nothing was wrong. As I was exiting the car an older woman and her friend made comments about me, essentially saying I was a selfish and disgusting human being for using the parking spot. They made sure to say this within earshot but not to my face. I was so angry that I confronted her and told her that I had an autoimmune disease and not to be so quick to judge. She accused me of lying and screamed in my face. I ended up spending half the dinner in the bathroom crying. I had so much guilt for using what I needed medically, between the looks I to at school having to use it and then being attacked publicly….no one should have to feel that way. Don’t be so quick to judge, just because someone looks fine on the outside doesn’t mean they are.

Reblogged from thingssheloves

If a person has ugly thoughts, it begins to show on the face. And when that person has ugly thoughts every day, every week, every year, the face gets uglier and uglier until it gets so ugly you can hardly bear to look at it. A person who has good thoughts cannot ever be ugly. You can have a wonky nose and a crooked mouth and a double chin and stick-out teeth, but if you have good thoughts they will shine out of your face like sunbeams and you will always look lovely.
Roald Dahl (via icanrelateto)

“Dragon’s eggs, from the Shadow Lands beyond Asshai,” said Magister Illyrio. “The eons have turned them to stone, yet still they burn bright with beauty.”

“I shall treasure them always.” Dany had heard tales of such eggs, but she had never seen one, nor thought to see one.

Reblogged from gameofthronesdaily